Education Services

Welcome to the Video Center page. Here you will find a variety of streaming videos covering a wide range of topics.

You will need the most recent version of Windows Media Player to view these broadcasts. Click
HERE to download the latest version. In addition, some broadcasts have material packets (in PDF format) you may download to refer to as you watch the associated video.

Some videos are accredited for COJET classroom credit. Please check with your training coordinator to determine if you can receive credit for viewing a program before viewing the video.

STUDENTS
To Receive COJET Credit:
Download the COJET Individual Accredited Evaluation form from the main COJET Classroom page, print it, fill it out and submit it to your training coordinator for credit. 
 
 LEGENDS OF THE JUDICIARY VIDEO SERIES
Arizona’s judicial history echoes the pioneering spirit of the first American settlers to break ground in her fertile soil. Though barely a century old, it is an epic story of individuals blazing a trail through seemingly insurmountable obstacles, all in the pursuit of one unifying goal...a better life not only for themselves, or their families, but for all Arizonans.

Join us in a celebration of the lives of seven prominent members of Arizona’s judiciary. Learn about the impact their careers have had on not only Arizona’s government, but that of the entire nation.  The Committee on Judicial Education and Training (COJET) and the Education Services Division offer a look into the lives of Hons.  Hayzel B. Daniels, Lorna Lockwood, Thomas Tang, Valdemar Cordova, William Rehnquist, Sandra Day O’Connor, and Francis X. Gordon., in a compelling video series produced and directed by Hon. Wendy Morton.

Each video is worth the run time for COJET Ethics credit. When submitted as independent learning with discussion questions programs may be worth up to 1.25 hours of COJET Ethics credit.

 Click on the title of the video you want to view:

Lorna Lockwood (29 min.) 
Lorna Lockwood dreamed of being a lawyer and a judge like her father.  When she decided to study law, the dean had to be persuaded to allow a woman to enroll in law school.  She ascended to the bench and not only became the first woman Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Arizona, but was the first woman to hold such a position in any state in the nation.  Justice Lockwood did not rest on her laurels; she was a mentor who opened doors for women lawyers throughout the State of Arizona.
Biography (PDF) 
Discussion Questions (PDF)

Hayzel B. Daniels (32 min.) -
Hayzel B. Daniels was a stand-out in nearly every field he tackled, from the football field to the courtroom.   He was the first African American to attend the University of Arizona law school, the first to be admitted as a lawyer in Arizona and, after being admitted, the only African American attorney in the state for 12 years.  Hayzel Daniels led the fight to desegregate Arizona’s public schools before the landmark Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education.  He became a mentor and role model as the first African American judge in Arizona, serving on the Phoenix Municipal Court.
Biography (PDF)
Discussion Questions (PDF)

Valdemar Cordova (23 min.) -
Valdemar Cordova developed his passion for the law as a Prisoner of War in World War II.  When he returned to Arizona, he followed his family’s tradition of civic leadership to improve the quality of life in the City of Phoenix.  Judge Cordova served twice as a Superior Court Judge for Maricopa County.  He was the first Hispanic to be appointed to the United States District Court in Arizona.
Biography (PDF)
Discussion Questions (PDF)

Thomas Tang (36 min.) -
Thomas Tang knew first-hand the challenges of growing up in a segregated society but he did not let that stop him from a career of giving back.  He was the first Asian American to serve as a member of the Phoenix City Council and as President of the State Bar of Arizona.  He was a member of the Civil Rights movement in Arizona along with Judge Daniels and Judge Cordova.  As a Judge on the Arizona Superior Court, he led the way to progressive changes within the juvenile justice system.  When a high-profile media case stirred the community into a frenzy, Judge Tang relied on his judicial ethics to do the right thing, despite great personal cost.  He ultimately rose above adversity and became a distinguished judge on the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.
Biography (PDF)
Discussion Questions (PDF)

Sandra Day O'Connor (49 min.) -
If you ask any young student to name a famous Justice of the United States Supreme Court, most will tell you the name of Sandra Day O’Connor, the first woman ever appointed to our nation’s highest court.  But to Arizonans, she is so much more than this singular accomplishment.  She is one of our own; a former legislator and attorney and a trial and appellate judge in Arizona.  She is a role model throughout the world and a tireless advocate for civic education and the rule of law.
Biography (PDF) 
Discussion Questions (PDF)

Francis X. Gordon (23 min.) -
Chief Justice Francis X. Gordon presided over what is perhaps the biggest constitutional crisis in Arizona’s history, the impeachment of sitting Governor Evan Meacham by the Arizona State Legislature.  Justice Gordon’s poise and dignified manner educated the thousands who watched the televised proceedings about the role of the judiciary.  His performance enhanced the stature of the judiciary for generations.  In addition, Justice Gordon made major improvements in the judiciary, including initiating the groundbreaking Commission on the Courts, a multi-disciplinary body that made recommendations to improve the court system that are still in place today.  Justice Gordon is also credited with being the father of judicial education.
Biography (PDF)
Discussion Questions (PDF)

William Rehnquist (34 min.) -
When he was a small boy, Bill Rehnquist predicted that he would “change the government.”  This he did, becoming a Justice of the United States Supreme Court and then our nation’s Chief Justice.  But it all started in Arizona, where William H. Rehnquist established his career and made a name for himself as an outstanding trial lawyer.  He left an impact on those he met in Arizona and never lost his affection for our state.
Biography (PDF)
Discussion Questions (PDF)